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<  General Scootering  ~  Ok, what's staking a nut?
nate
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:06 pm  Reply with quote
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Yeah yeah, staking nut ha ha laugh at it now mr/ms. immature (egan) and just move on.

I've been reading various non-scooter mechanic issues, and some of them have talked about staking a nut. Everybody says to do it in these (high-torque, make sure it doesn't come off) situations, and some people helpfully include a very blurry picture to refer to.

Near as I can gather, when you're staking a nut, there's generally some sort of indent on the flush surface the bolt mates to. Then you take a screwdriver/punch/something and line it up with the indent, and beat the hell out of the nut with a hammer. This dimples the metal of the nut down into the indentation, and then prevents it from wiggling out on its own.

Yes/no?

If yes, then what precautions does one need to take when you're trying to back out a nut that's been staked, or will the torque be enough to deform the soft-metal nut, in relation to the more durable mating surface?
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SS180
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:37 pm  Reply with quote
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heh heh...you said "nut"
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nate
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:35 pm  Reply with quote
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I also said "mating surface", which I think was funnier.

I did not mention that when you're pounding upon your nuts with a hammer, you should probably take great care to not bust a nut.

Busting a nut in the wrong situation can cause nothing but trouble.

Busting a nut while pounding on it with a hammer might be one of those cases.

(I figure if I make all these jokes myself, maybe it'll actually get me a real answer, as I'll be taking all of the ammunition away from you yahoos.)


Last edited by nate on Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:40 pm; edited 2 times in total

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ron
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:38 pm  Reply with quote
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beat the hell out of the nut with a hammer?! oucha-doodles!!!

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Tom Lindsay
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:41 pm  Reply with quote
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All that's coming to my mind with regard to staking a nut is Buffy.

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Matty
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:43 pm  Reply with quote
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So what part are you having trouble taking off on the Focus?

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nate
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:57 pm  Reply with quote
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Actually it's kind of unrelated. This came up during one of my searches for crush washers and their implementation on Honda oil pans, and more digging on crush washers took me to an acura NSX axle replacement. Very circuitous.

The Focus has a busted piece of plastic that's part of the window regulator. The window is attached to a clamp inside the door, and this clamp is hooked to a loop of cable. Press the window button, and the cable rotates one way or the other, taking the clamp up and down with it. The piece of plastic is the part that keeps the cable centered in the vertical cable guide channel, so without it, you hear a lot of scraping and grinding. I JB welded it yesterday (YES!) but didn't let it cure long enough, and it broke. (booo.) I wasn't that disheartened by it, as I figured it was a $20 piece of plastic.

Today I find out that that piece of plastic is only sold as a complete assembly of the window regulator (all the guilde channels, cables, pulleys, etc) as well as the window motor. Which is $150. Ouch.

So maybe I'll revisit my JB Weld, but I thought I'd try and find a junkshop part first.


And now you know the inner workings of the Miller garage.

new motto: There is such a thing as too much torque. That only took me years to learn. (not that I've re-learned this lesson in the past few days, I'm just very mindful of it.)

So, somebody explain this whole staking an nut thing.
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Egan
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 3:18 pm  Reply with quote
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They are commonly found in seating, chassis, suspension and door applications within the automotive industry. Typically these products are used for anti-rotation in the assembly process. These products also have application in other industries such as appliance, heavy trucks, heavy equipment, construction and recreational vehicles.

Staking also can be done with cotter pin type of fasteners. (its to keep them from turning).

They are usually removed with a chisel. (yup chisel your your staked nuts)
Also kind of a pinch nut idea.

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nate
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 4:02 pm  Reply with quote
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So the cotter pin stuff (what website did you cut and paste that from) is basically the rear castellated nut.


So that explains the application, but it really is just beating the hell out of the nut with a hammer? Ok. I'd never heard of it before (surprise) but every site that talked about it just made it seem like a fairly basic procedure that everybody had dealt with before.
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Lisa
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 7:22 pm  Reply with quote
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Per my dad (who knows these things):

You are best off with a lock nut like a nylock rather than staking your own, they tend to be real hard to get off, and you end up stripping the threads.

If you need them in a funky size let me know.
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some_dude
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 7:57 pm  Reply with quote
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Lisa wrote:
You are best off with a lock nut like a nylock

I know a guy that has a nylon nut. Replaced the one he lost in a nasty ski racing incident (think very sharp edges). I had no idea prosthetic nuts existed until I heard his story.

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Lisa
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 8:08 pm  Reply with quote
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some_dude wrote:
I know a guy that has a nylon nut. Replaced the one he lost in a nasty ski racing incident (think very sharp edges). I had no idea prosthetic nuts existed until I heard his story.


Gee thanks. Now I'm really glad I joined the ski patrol.
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Anesthesia
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 8:47 pm  Reply with quote
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some_dude wrote:
Lisa wrote:
You are best off with a lock nut like a nylock

I know a guy that has a nylon nut. Replaced the one he lost in a nasty ski racing incident (think very sharp edges). I had no idea prosthetic nuts existed until I heard his story.



yep they're called nuticals. you can buy them for your dog if you feel bad about getting him fixed. and now they have them for people.

...what? ... i saw it on an episode of nip/tuck once, that's all...

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nate
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 9:15 pm  Reply with quote
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neuticals.

See, everybody just keeps talking about staking nuts, but nobody just comes out and says, "Yes, staking a nut just means beating the hell out of it until it's deformed and it won't come loose."

I don't have nuts that need staking.
I'm just intrigued by the concept.
Kind of like putting the circlips on so they face the right direction, as well as being aligned properly. All these little 'commonsense logical obvious" things that mechanics deal with all the time, and idiots like myself are wondrously oblivious to.

I wouldn't mind a handful of m14 crush washers.
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SteveG
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:01 pm  Reply with quote
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Quote:
Kind of like putting the circlips on so they face the right direction, as well as being aligned properly


Oh-oh! I didn't know there was a "right" direction, and I can't figure out how there could be one. Is there a fine point of circlips that I've missed, or is it just in some certain situations? Inquiring minds want to know...

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